Invisible - Invisible
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Invisible
Invisible
(Self Released)

Last year, the group Invisible released their self-titled EP on their own label. Blending organic instrumentation and electronic elements, it was a release that showed flashes of real breakthrough, but ultimately felt a bit unsure of itself. Just more than a year later, the group is back with a full-length (also self-titled and self-released) and it seems they either really focused or simply made a conscious effort to put different work on the EP, because this newest release from the group is much more fleshed-out.

One of the biggest changes for the group is a use of vocals on just about every track, as well as much more developed instrumentation and a real feel for almost straightforward pop structuring at times. "Rows Of Unbending Lines" opens the release with some electronic shimmering before a solid rhythm section and guitar work arrive and push the track forward into a loud crescendo before it breaks off and vocals from Chris Larson give it a playful, awkward feel before it launches into a blistering, dense finale with strings, walls of guitar, and pummeling drums.

"Now It's A Year (Going On Six Years)" is easily the poppiest thing the group has ever done, mixing a main piano melody with ebowed guitar and a mixture of programmed and live drums behind the nostalgic lyrics. With a slew of guest instrumentalists, the full-length release expands the sonic palette of the EP in large amounts as chimes, horns, strings, steel guitar, and loads of other instrumentation find their way into the mix. Because of this, the electronic elements don't figure in quite as much (and when they do, it's mainly to add a polyrhythm with the live percussion), but the organic instrumentation more than fills things out.

With the release, the group joins artists like Namelessnumberheadman and other independent artists who are creating unique and interesting music of such a high quality that it's hard to believe that more people haven't heard of them. From the horn-infused, Tortoise-esque windy-city grooves of "Make Nothing Happen" to the touch-of-country ballad "We Know Better," the group pulls off just about everything they try. With twelve tracks running nearly an hour in length, the release does start to feel a little bit redundant in places towards the latter half, but considering the overall package (from the songs themselves to the production to the album artwork), Invisible have created an under-the-radar (but hopefully gaining steam) gem.

rating: 7.2510
Aaron Coleman 2005-10-13 20:13:10