Grandaddy - Signal To Snow Ratio
Buy this CD from Amazon.com United States
Buy this CD from Amazon.com Canada
Buy this CD from Amazon.com United Kingdom
Buy this CD from Insound.com.
Grandaddy
Signal To Snow Ratio

The thing with CD singles and EPs is that for the most part, their goal of existance is to get you interested enough to buy a full-length release. Most UK singles only run 3 tracks or less, and although there are some groups who put out EPs that are full-length in recorded time (mainly electronic outfits), I can't help but feel unsatisfied after hearing most singles. This single/EP (I'm not quite sure what it is) by Grandaddy is no different. With 4 tracks that clock in for a total time of a whole 12.5 minutes, the group shows some promise, but everything is over too damn quick for me to form much of an opinion otherwise.

By far, the best track on the disc is the first cut entitled "Hand Crank Transmitter." The upper-northwest style rocker rocker feels sort of like 764-Hero with a full guitar and rhythm section and little odd bits of radio feedback and noise thrown in for good measure. It's a catchy track that sounds like it could be Weezer if it laid off the static and squiggles. From this track out, though, the album just doesn't go much of anywhere. On "Jeddy 3's Poem," a computer-voice sings along with minimal piano playing (perhaps trying to mimic a bit of Radioheads "Fitter, Happier" from OK Computer) and while "MGM Grand" is mildly funny and catchy, it just doesn't do a whole lot musically. The final track "Protected From The Rain" is fairly interesting as well, stripped down to muted vocals, some piano and more quiet radio noise.

Overall, the tracks on the release are fairly decent (with one standout), but they just don't really grab your attention the way they should for being on such a short release. In the end, I'm just sort of undecided about whether I should be interested in the group or not. I guess they'll have to show me one way or the other with some more music.

rating: 4.510
Aaron Coleman 2003-06-19 00:00:00